CISO Summit France | October 24, 2017 | Paris, France

↓ Agenda Key

Keynote Presentation

Visionary speaker presents to entire audience on key issues, challenges and business opportunities

Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee." title="Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee.

Executive Visions

Panel moderated by Master of Ceremonies and headed by four executives discussing critical business topics

Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members." title="Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members.

Thought Leadership

Solution provider-led session giving high-level overview of opportunities

Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community." title="Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community.

Think Tank

End user-led session in boardroom style, focusing on best practices

Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard." title="Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard.

Roundtable

Interactive session led by a moderator, focused on industry issue

Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done." title="Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done.

Case Study

Overview of recent project successes and failures

Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions." title="Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions.

Focus Group

Discussion of business drivers within a particular industry area

Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions." title="Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions.

Analyst Q&A Session

Moderator-led coverage of the latest industry research

Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst." title="Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst.

Vendor Showcase

Several brief, pointed overviews of the newest solutions and services

Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences." title="Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences.

Executive Exchange

Pre-determined, one-on-one interaction revolving around solutions of interest

Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest." title="Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest.

Open Forum Luncheon

Informal discussions on pre-determined topics

Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch." title="Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch.

Networking Session

Unique activities at once relaxing, enjoyable and productive

Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive." title="Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive.

 

Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - CISO Summit France

7:00 am - 7:55 am

Registration and Networking Breakfast

 

8:00 am - 8:10 am

Welcome Address and Opening Remarks

 

8:10 am - 8:40 am

Keynote Presentation

Addressing Privacy on a Global Scale

Of all the risk management issues that present themselves to the modern-day CISO, perhaps the most difficult to address is that of privacy. In and of itself, privacy is no different a challenge than protecting any other sensitive information, however the multi-jurisdictional impacts of the issue due to wildly differing laws between the US and European countries (as well as Canada, another country with strong privacy laws) make this an issue that is often times overwhelming to address. CISOs must work diligently to ensure that their privacy efforts conform with the standards of any jurisdiction with which they might work, where their data might be held and this is an almost overwhelming task.

Takeaways:

  • Privacy is one of the most challenging issues for any business and CISO to address
  • The difference in regulations between and among European countries (both those in and out of the EU itself) and North American ones means traversing a fraught landscape
  • A strong approach to privacy that addresses global differences is essential to being a stable and viable global business
 

8:45 am - 9:15 am

Keynote Presentation

Security's Place in Enterprise Risk Management

While Information Security has existed for decades, Enterprise Risk Management (ERM), as a formal and holistic practice, is much newer yet already has taken pre-eminence over its forebear. What is the CISO, who in many ways has toiled in invisibility, infamy, or ignominy to do when faced with the issue of being supplanted by the Chief Risk Officer, just as enterprise demand for and focus on security has reached all-time heights? Savvy CISOs will recognize this new, broader need for holistic visibility into, and management of, overall enterprise risk and will position themselves for success by looking beyond traditional information security boundaries and engaging business partners around all enterprise risk.

Takeaways:

  • Just because information security is an aspect of enterprise risk doesn't mean that the CISO needs to take a back seat position
  • Enterprise risk is defined by the business but needs to be quantified by an expert; CISOs bring risk quantification expertise to the table
  • The end goal is not about fiefdoms and ownership, it is about improving enterprise value and success; maintaining focus is essential
 

9:20 am - 9:45 am

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Identity and the New Age of Enterprise Security

From a technology standpoint, as a society the world of business has gone through two distinct stages in the evolution of its information security focus. The first addressed network based protection and preventative controls such as firewalls and anti-malware. The second looked at data-centric and detective controls such as encryption and intrusion/extrusion monitoring. Since breaches continue to occur at a record pace, what is need new is clearly a new evolution, one that pushes towards individual focused security through granular user monitoring and management as provided by solutions such as Identity and Access Management. While IAM isn't a new technology field, it is one whose time has come and CISO need to begin investing in modern-day, light-weight, easy to implement IAM solutions now to stay ahead of the curve, and reduce enterprise threats.

Takeaways:

  • The breach onslaught demonstrates that existing security solutions are incapable of defending current threats
  • Enterprises need to begin looking at security from an activity perspective rather than an artifact perspective
  • IAM provides activity insight, and therefore threat awareness, no other platform can equal
 

9:50 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Increase Your Security Intelligence and Enterprise Compliance

The breadth and depth of security threats that are targeting the modern enterprise are bordering on overwhelming, but they're not alone as the breadth and depth of security solutions are also bordering on overwhelming. When security managers have to respond to alerts and warnings from dozens of security systems, and CISOs have to make strategic decisions based on fragmented data, it's hard to argue that security is improving. Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) platforms that aggregate the vast quantities of data, correlate diverse events, and filter the signal from the noise are allowing enterprises to get back ahead of the curve and make appropriate tactical and strategic decisions.

Takeaways:

  • The life of enterprise security staff is being complicated not just by the threats they face, but the tools they use
  • Abandoning tools isn't an option and CISOs need to help themselves and their staff get ahead of the curve
  • SIEM offers significant benefits in separating the wheat from the chaff and letting the business actually become secure

Roundtable

Improving Email Deliverability AND Security

It may seem self-evident, but email is still the predominant form of business communication whether in B2B or B2C channels with business sending over 100 billion emails each and every day. Not all of this traffic is legitimate, desired, or safe however with estimates that as much as 90% of all email traffic can be considered spam or worse. In this environment businesses need to ensure that the email they send is viewed as trustworthy, and that the mail they receive is safe of threats. To do this email authentication is imperative and DMARC, Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance is the gold standard. While DMARC policies are published to public DNS servers and already protect up to 60% of mailboxes for the most part these are public mailboxes from consumer email providers and many businesses are still on the outside looking in. Savvy IT Leaders know that they need to leverage commercial solutions that streamline DMARC management for their own email infrastructure to ensure they are protected from threats, and able to communicate with partners, clients, and prospects.

Takeaways:

  • Email authentication is essential in today's spam-centric world to ensure deliverability of key business communications
  • Email authentication also ensures businesses are protected from the myriad email based security threats that assail them every day
  • DMARC provides this protection but management can be convoluted and time consuming without focused management solutions
 

10:20 am - 10:30 am

Morning Networking Coffee Break

 

10:35 am - 11:00 am

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Building Dynamic Security Teams

There's no other way to say it than bluntly; Information Security is a white-hot field within Information Technology as a whole " over the last dozen years it has gone from after-thought, to scapegoat, to critical enterprise success factor. As a result, the need for capable and qualified Information Security specialists, whether front-line Analysts, mid-level Managers, or top level CISOs is at an all time high, but personnel and skills availability is sinking to an all-time (at least in terms of supply and demand ratio) low. There simply isn't enough expertise in existence to go around, or enough education occurring to create it. In this environment, senior Information Security leaders have to get creative in their pursuit of the people, performance, and passion necessary to address this capability shortfall.

Takeaways:

  • Learn how to build grass-roots programs that cultivate a farm full of potential security experts through internal and collaborative programs
  • Find out how to leverage key organizational traits to generate buzz and interest where none existed before
  • Understand the relevance of certs vs. experience and how to evaluate and validate the value of candidates

Think Tank

Avoiding ERM for the Sake of ERM

In many ways ERM, or Enterprise Risk Management, has become just another buzz word that is bandied around without any clear understanding of it's meaning, any clear understanding of it's value, or any clear understanding of how it can be achieved. ERM is not a project or a task on a list to be checked off. Instead it is a fundamental change in how an enterprise approaches the way it conducts it's business to ensure that all possible impacts to it's capital and earnings are identified, quantified, and mitigated. Such a sweeping paradigmatic shift isn't something that can be taken on lightly and enterprises seeking to just place a check mark next to a to do list line item will be sorely disappointed in their results.

Takeaways:

  • ERM is a way of life, not a one-time effort and the only way to value is to come to that realization early
  • To be successful, an ERM deployment must be sponsored from the top and have the involvement of every level and every department
  • Even though ERM initiatives are all-encompassing it's best to start small; trying to boil the ocean is the surest way to failure and loss of good will and buy-in
 

11:05 am - 11:30 am

Executive Exchange

 

Case Study

Is Security Obscuring the Benefit of the Cloud?

Cloud delivered computing services, whether Software, Platform, or Infrastructure as a Service offer the potential of significant business advantages such as reduced cost and increased flexibility. These advantages however come with very real risks, chief among them security concerns and the risk of data and compliance breaches " how do you secure what you can't see, touch, and control? Join our panel as we explore both the security and compliance issues inherent in Cloud deployments, look at the hidden issues that first time Cloud adopters may simply not be aware of, and discuss through solutions that can be used to address these challenges and allow enterprises to fully and firmly embrace the Cloud.

Takeaways:

  • Be exposed to the true security and compliance cloud threat landscape
  • Learn how successful cloud adopters have mitigated these risks
  • Discover how to build cloud protection capabilities keyed to your needs
 

11:35 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Securing Divergent Endpoints

Over the last few years, as cloud and mobile technologies have taken hold within the enterprise, the concept of the network perimeter has dissolved, and with it the concepts around traditional network security. The broad scale adoption of IoT technologies however will make this first phase of network disaggregation seem trivial in comparison as enterprises begin to connect to not just thousands but millions of disparate and divergent endpoints. To ensure appropriate security in such a dispersed networking world and entirely new paradigm to security will be required that encompasses not just wildly diverse types of devices in wildly diverse locations, but the threat of low-powered, low complexity endpoints that have no internal capacity for monitored and managed security capabilities.

Takeaways:

  • The number and type of enterprise endpoints is about to go through explosive growth and each of these endpoints will represent security threat
  • These new endpoints will not have the capacity for internal security and so central security solutions will be required to ensure appropriate protection
  • The volume and variety of new security data feeds and security threat info will overwhelm traditional security platforms and capabilities

Roundtable

Security in an Outsourced World

Building security into your enterprise processes, and integrating it with your existing technology investments has never been more critical or complicated than it is in this era of decentralized computing, and ever-tightening compliance requirements. Furthering this complication is the impact that partnering deals can have since infrastructure, applications, and even data may now longer be under your direct control. To be able to ensure efficient and effective security capabilities you need to understand the nature of the threats that exist today, the impact a sourcing relationship can have on these threats, and the mitigation strategies and tools key industry leaders are using to address the challenge.

Takeaways:

  • Social, Mobile, Cloud, and Analytics is already having a significant impact on enterprise security, sourcing potentially adds another layer of complexity
  • Beyond simple security however there are also issues such as privacy and compliance that also need to be considered
  • Investing in the right tools and practices is essential to weather the storm without breaking the bank
 

12:05 pm - 12:30 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Physical and Digital Convergence

The discussion around the convergence of physical security and information security dates back over a decade, but though much was made of the concept in the early 2000's little was actually done and the buzz faded. Flash-forward to today however and the buzz is back because of the increased focus on holistic risk management, the increased pressure of greater compliance requirements, and the increased demand for every aspect of the business to be a value generator. CISOs and CIROs need to evaluate the opportunities for both technology convergence (streamlining platforms) and organizational convergence (streamlining roles) to meet new threat protections mandates.

Takeaways:

  • As enterprise security matures and morphs or integrates into enterprise risk management, converged security becomes a must have
  • Convergence allows for far greater levels of visibility and control of threats and threat actors
  • Convergence enhances not just base security but also top-level risk management, enterprise compliance, and even operational value

Think Tank

Shadow IT " To Embrace or Eliminate?

Best practice in most enterprises, at least as far as the CIO and CISO goes, is to squash Shadow IT wherever it is encountered. Shadow IT, the argument goes, leads to a world of data and integration problems for the IT department, and significant amounts of unknown and unquantifiable risk for the information security group. A small but vocal minority however is beginning to advocate for Shadow IT as a catalyst of innovation, citing the increases in productivity and creativity by allowing enterprise staff to find their own out of the box solutions to organizational problems. CISOs can allow their organizations to have their cake (Shadow IT) and eat it too (still be secure) by following a few simple steps that allow them to build in security regardless of user activity.

Takeaways:

  • Shadow IT is not malicious activity; it is simply the Line of Business user community looking to be efficient and effective
  • A well-developed security program can take Shadow IT into account and incorporate protection mechanisms that allow end user flexibility
  • Embracing Shadow IT does not mean no holds barred and end users need to understand the limit of the boundaries and the reason for their existence
 

12:35 pm - 1:20 pm

Networking Luncheon

 

1:25 pm - 1:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Speaking the Language of the Business

For many years the CIO, has struggled with the concept of IT-Business alignment and finding ways to ensure that the IT department and the Lines of Business with which it integrates have a common understanding and ability to communicate. Now, as the CISO and the information security department grow out of the IT shadow, they increasingly find themselves in the same position. Their challenge however is greater in that the concepts of IT security are in many ways more abstract than those of generalist IT, and their activities often run counter to the goals of the rest of the organization. CISOs must learn for the trials and tribulations of the CIO and the IT department, and find common ground with the business, to ensure they can hear what their partners are saying, while communicating their own points in understandable terms.

Takeaways:

  • IT-Business communications have long been strained and only now are improving across most organizations through concerted effort
  • IT has had to find ways to speak the language of the business " it was not the business that learned to speak IT
  • The CISO must adopt and emulate the successful communications practices and strategies of the IT department or risk serious relationship issues

Think Tank

Building a Collaborative and Social IT Security Program

In todays environment there can be no arguing that a comprehensive IT Security program is a de facto requirement for every organization. Such a program needs to address the full range of security threats that can be leveraged against an organization, needs to be integrated into whatever regulatory and governance requirements exist, but beyond that it needs to be accessible, consumable, and actionable by everyone that is influenced by it, or interacts with it. Building a program that is shared through social channels and relies on the collaborative input of employees and constituents for not only creation but enforcement will drive higher levels of adoption, responsiveness and, ultimately, protection.

Takeaways:

  • A security program, that is the stated intentions of the organization combined with the policies and tools to back those intentions up is essential
  • The program needs to be easily communicated, easily consumed, and easily complied with
  • Using an open social and collaborative approach to creation, distribution, and enforcement ensure greater adoption and ultimately greater security
 

1:55 pm - 2:20 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Fireside Chat

Balancing Reactivity and Proactivity in Enterprise Security

As with all things in life, the focus on how to conduct enterprise security ebbs and flows between varying degrees of reactivity and proactivity. In the old school Security 1.0 world, where the focus was almost completely on network security, efforts were in general proactive in nature with firewalls and anti-malware seeking to prevent threats before they even occurred. This didn't work so well and so Security 2.0 focused on reactivity, wrapping things like encryption around the data so that even if a breach occurred, the loss would be mitigated. Yet breaches, and losses, continue to occur. So if primarily proactive security doesn't work, and if primarily reactive security also doesn't work, how then do we find the right balance between the two to find a security posture that does work?

Takeaways:

  • Proactive security measures, those that prevent a threat from occurring are valuable and necessary but haven't proven effective
  • Reactive security measures, those that mitigate a threat that has occurred are also valuable but complicated a limit enterprise efficiency and efficacy
  • A new approach is needed, but is that one that blends techniques or one that finds new approaches (whether they be reactive, proactive, or both)?
 

2:25 pm - 2:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Roundtable

Cyber-Espionage and the Advanced Persistent Threat

More and more C-level executives are realizing that cyber security is not just an IT function given the far-reaching and direct impact that cyber security threats can have on current and future business operations. As is evidenced in recent reports from security providers such as Mendicant, McAfee, SentinelOne and others, cyber espionage attacks by APT actors are breaching organizations both large and small, public and private. Whether the objective is Intellectual Property (IP), M&A information, financial records, or other business-sensitive protected data losses can result in significant brand, reputation, and financial impacts. To counter these risks, CISOs need to realize that traditional security techniques are insufficient, and that a new tier of security solutions are required to defend against the APT attack.

Takeaways:

  • The era of cheap, powerful, and unique security threats is upon us and in this era traditional tools are insufficient
  • These Advanced Persistent Threats can be targeted at any organization, not just the biggest and the richest
  • Tools that allow for quick detection AND dynamic response are key; it's not just finding the door is open, but closing it quickly that is key

Roundtable

Applying Big Data Principles to Security Paradigms

Volume, variety, velocity, veracity; all four of the hallmarks of Big Data have a clear fit in the world of security as the number of threats grows, their natures diverge, the speed with they are encountered (and subsequently have to be dealt with) accelerates, and the need to be ever more accurate enhances. As enterprises have made significant investments in Big Data programs and analytics platforms, they are beginning to reap real benefits in terms of business efficiency and innovation. The time then has come to begin applying those same principles and platforms to the security challenges facing enterprises to allow for faster, more effective overall security.

Takeaways:

  • The nature of the enterprise security challenge closely mimics many of the Big Data challenges business are beginning to learn how to solve
  • Just as Big Data challenges required different tools to address for Line of Business and general IT issues, so they will for information security challengeSecurity must become the next focus for analytics capabilities, and analytics the next focus for security professionals
 

2:55 pm - 3:20 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Data-Centric Security

For years the security focus of the enterprise was to build a hardened perimeter at the edge of the network, an impenetrable shell that kept the good out and the bad in. Over the last few years this model has fallen by the wayside. Technologies such as Cloud and Mobility have pushed the enterprise beyond its traditional perimeter while increased levels of partnership have created inroads through that shell. As a result, infrastructure based security is no longer sufficient or appropriate and enterprises everywhere are having to make the shift to a new security paradigm, one that is centered on the data itself, not on the infrastructure that houses it.

Takeaways:

  • Learn the principles of data-centric security
  • Understand the role encryption plays and how it should be integrated
  • Determine when and where data monitoring tools make sense

Think Tank

Best-of-Breed or Consolidated: Principles in Security Architecture Design

When it comes to implementing network security infrastructure there are two schools of thought: use best-of-breed point solutions, or go with all round consolidated platforms. Pros and cons abound for either approach revolving around varying levels of protection, integration, and administrative overhead but the increasing complexity of current security infrastructure is showing a winning approach. Even though consolidated solutions may offer greater benefits in the long run, no one exists in a green-field situation when it comes to network and infrastructure security so careful planning is required to ensure the necessary protection.

Takeaways:

  • The management burden of best-of-breed outweighs performance benefits
  • Consolidated platforms can lead to feature overlap and unnecessary cost
  • Planning is required to maximize coverage but minimize effort and spend
 

3:25 pm - 3:35 pm

Afternoon Networking Coffee Break

 

3:40 pm - 4:05 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Innovation Showcase

An exclusive opportunity to be exposed to the hottest new solutions providers in a quick-hit format designed to whet the appetite and spark immediate interest.
 

4:10 pm - 4:35 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Security and Compliance; Chicken and Egg or Chalk and Cheese?

Since regulatory (and industry) compliance became a notable thing in the early-mid 2000's it has been intimately linked with information security and often times has been the lever (or hammer) by which enterprises made necessary investments in security. But being compliant and being secure aren't the same thing, and in too many cases enterprises that were perfectly compliant have been perfectly breached. A new focus is needed; one that respects that while security and compliance are not the same thing, they are working towards the same goal (a reduction in overall enterprise risk exposure) and sees that compliance flows from security.

Takeaways:

  • While a secure company is likely a compliant company, the same cannot be said of the reverse situation
  • Just because compliance has loosened the purse strings doesn't mean it takes a pre-eminent position on security investments
  • Reducing enterprise risk is the goal of both practices but without appropriate focus on both is a goal that will never be achieved

Think Tank

How to be Socially Secure (or Securely Social)

Social media is the least hyped and potentially least adopted of the so-called disruptive technologies, at least by enterprises in general. This doesn't mean that employees are embracing these tools personally however, nor does it mean that enterprises should continue to avoid them. The fact of the matter is social platforms allow for incredible levels of interaction that when harnessed can lead to significant creativity and productivity gains allowing enterprises that adopt and encourage the use of social collaboration platforms to be more successful than their non-social peers. But every newly adopted technology brings with it unique problems and so it is the CISOs job to provide the secure landscape within which this social collaboration, both internal and external, sanctioned and not, can occur.

Takeaways:

  • Your employees are already social whether you realize it or not, facilitate it or not so ignoring the issue only leads to greater security problems
  • Social collaboration presents a real security threat as information is more freely shared, and interactions occur outside the boundaries of enterprise control
  • Social security programs must be built in layers, addressing first unsanctioned use, then sanctioned all while differentiating between internal and external social activity
 

4:40 pm - 5:20 pm

Executive Visions

Facilitating Technology-Enabled Business Transformation

The role of the modern IT Executive is more complex than it has ever been before, not just because the technology landscape has become more complex, but also because increasingly IT execs have had to become a business-focused executive, not just a technologist. Long have we talked about the CIO and CISO getting a seat at the table but modern businesses are now demanding that their technology impresario join them and leverage his deep and rich technical acumen to allow the organization as a whole to better position itself for market-place success. To be successful, CxOs need to invest in themselves, in their personnel, and in the right technologies to allow them to position the IT department to proactively address business needs as an innovator and driver, rather than order-taker and enabler.

Takeaways:

  • IT leadership can no longer be simply technology focused, but must instead take their visibility into business process and become business focused
  • A broader business-focus does not preclude maintaining technology excellence however and indeed may demand more of it than ever before
  • Success for CxOs will be measured not in how they can enable enterprise decisions, but in how they can drive growth
 

5:20 pm - 5:30 pm

Thank You Address and Closing Remarks

 

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Cocktail Reception